Is it better to use Ally for checking accessibility or the accessibility checker built into Word/PPT/PDF?

Contact the Accessible Media Coordinator

Robert Starr
Accessible Media Coordinator

Assistive Technology Initiative
MS: 6A11
Voice: 703-993-5644
Fax: 703-993-4743
rstarr@gmu.edu

Contact the IT Accessibility Coordinator

Kristine Neuber
IT Accessibility Coordinator

Assistive Technology Initiative
MS: 6A11
Voice: 703-993-9815
Fax: 703-993-4743
kneuber@gmu.edu

Have Assistive Technology Questions? Contact Us!

Korey Singleton
Deputy ADA Coordinator for Accessibility and ATI Manager

Assistive Technology Initiative
MS: 6A11
Voice: 703-993-4329
Fax: 703-993-4743
ksinglet@gmu.edu

Have questions? Contact the ATI:

Assistive Technology Initiative
MS: 6A11
Voice: 703-993-4329
Fax: 703-993-4743
ati@gmu.edu

Keep in mind that there are no perfect document accessibility checker solutions. It is always likely that one solution identifies an error that another solution might miss entirely.

Whenever possible, it is a good idea to use both the accessibility checker built into the native application of your document (e.g., Microsoft Office Word, PPT, or Adobe Acrobat). The more information you have to correct any issues you might have the better. For more information on how to use the accessibility checkers in Word, PPT, and/or Adobe Acrobat, see Creating Accessible Documents.